NEWSLETTER OF "MEETING 64/128 USERS THROUGH THE MAIL" JEAN NANCE, PRESIDENT ROUTE 1, BOX 151

VU ST. JOSEPH, IL 61873 TG

COMMODORE MAIL en NOVEMBER 1990

MEETING NEWS. WELCOME to the new members whose "bios" are in this issue. Write to some of them and get acquainted. Keep this list with your September membership list; a master list won't be sent out again until March. Be sure to watch for address changes and corrections in each CML, and record the necessary changes in your lists.

The information on five new members arrived too late to be included in the September CML, although their names were in the September membership list. John Elliott, Maurice Jones, Cecilia Kwiecian, Bea Lincoln, and Glenn Parks were also among.the group who joined in July and August.

Debbie Nandlal's last name was spelled "Mandlal" in the September list. Sorry. Look for Debbie under the N's.

DUES ARE DUE! Dues for 1991 have been set at $12. This will cover the expected increase in postal rates and allow each CML to be a little bigger. We charge members in countries other than the U.S. and Mexico a fee to cover extra postage. For Canadian members, the postal fee is $1.00. For members in all other countries, the postal fee is $10.

Dues should be sent to Eloise Carey, 155 Sienna St.. Morro Bay, CA. 93442, before December 15th. Mail your dues to Elly early, if at all possible; avoid the holiday rush. Make out checks or money orders to "Meeting 64/128 Users", which is the name on our bank account.

Please send dues on time, so that we know how many January newsletters are needed. If

dues come straggling in through January and into February it causes extra work for Elly and makes planning difficult.

RESOURCE PEOPLE. Our group is growing, and a few of us are finding it difficult to deal with requests for help from members who have computing problems. We would like to have a list of "resource people" who could help with questions and problems. This would be published in the CML, so members would know where to go for help. If you feel competent in an aspect of computing, and are willing to help others, please write to Jean Nance, co-

editor of the January CML, and volunteer to be on the resource list. Specify the area or areas.

THANK YOU, LOADSTAR. Paul McAleer is a “beta tester" and contributor to Loadstar, a disk magazine. He recommended our group to the editor, and encouraged me to send a letter about the group. This information appeared in Loadstar #76, out in early September. Even before that, two other Loadstar beta testers, Maurice Jones and John Elliott saw the preview disk and joined. Once the issue was out, I was deluged with inquiries, and many of those who have joined since are Loadstar subscribers. Ask them what they think of this publication.

THANK YOU, QUANTUM LINK. I am a member of QuantumLink. This is a complimentary membership, given to one officer or representative of each Commodore user's group by QLink. This membership, includes five hours of "plus" time; a service that would normally cost about $30 a month. I use this time to keep in touch with Elly Carey and other members on group business. I also communicate with Commodore user's group leaders around the country on the Group Leader's message board. We are grateful to QLInk for providing this service.

THANK YOU ALL, AND HAPPY HOLIDAYS! As we reach the end of another year, I'd like to greet every member. Thanks to all the members who are keeping in touch with and helping other members, contributing to the CML, and helping spread the word about our group. Special thanks to Elley Carey and Brian Vaughan, without whom this group would not be possible.

Thanks to our CML editors for 1990: Bill Robinson, Bill Lyons, Aaron Peromsik, Bob and Allie Hunter, and Lonnie Smathers. A Very Happy New Year to you all, and I know 1991 will be another great year for "Meeting 64/128 Users Through the Mail."

KRRRKAKHK

GUEST EDITOR'S COLUMN By Lonnie F. Smathers

I have enjoyed editing this issue of the Commodore MaiLink. It has been a challenge and a rewarding experience. However, I would not have been able to see this issue to its completion without the valuable assistance and expertise of Jean Nance and Brian Vaughan. Thanks, both of you! Also thanks to Eloise Carey and Bill Robinson for their contributions to this CML. And thanks to all those who submitted material. My apologies to those whose articles I could not use. The banner for this issue was created by my nephew, Ian Smathers, using GeoPaint (Berkeley Softworks -- now GeoWorks). I reduced the banner on a copier to save space.

Bill Lyons and Jean Nance will be co-editors of the January CML. Mail all material to Jean to arrive by December 21st. Anything over a few lines should be on disk. Use any format, but indicate on the disk what word processor was used. Lawrence Chin will be the editor of the March CHL.

ADDRESSES for ...

MEETING 64/128 USERS THROUGH THE MAIL Jean Nance, President

Organization business, donations, dues, membership, newsletter: ...Jean Nance, Route 1, Box 151, St. Joseph, IL 61873

Treasurer: .. Eloise Carey, 155 Sienna, Morro Bay, CA 93442

Membership addresses and biographies; corrections and changes: ..Brian Vaughan, 2101 Shoreline Dr. 352, Alameda, CA 94501

Commodore Mail Link is published every other month by Meeting 64/128 Users Throug The Mail. Commodore (R) and the Commodore logo are both trademarks of Commodore Business Machines, Inc. All references to the foregoing should be so noted.

Copyright (C) 1990 by Meeting 64/128 Users Through The Mail. All rights reserved. No part of Mail Link may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, without permission in writing.

Any and all opinions expressed in this publication are the views of the authors and in no way necessarily reflect the viewpoints, attitudes, or policies of Meeting 64/128 Users group unlss so stated or indicated. |

Neither Commodore Mail Link nor Meeting 64/128 Users Through The Mail advocates or condones the piracy of copyrighted software. All programs published are with the permission of the author or are, to the best of our knowledge, in the public domain.

All manuscripts, or any material for review or publication, should be sent to the editor (see "Editor's Desk"). Mail Link reserves the right to edit submissions.

FINANCIAL REPORT By Eloise Carey

June 30, 1990 Balance .............cccceees $1,134.86 JULY /AUGUSC: DEPOSITS ici sos 5 hes SHR As 242.25 Interest Earned ....... giastaviat igual aie enact aera vores uharte-eeaiens 8.06 July/August Expenses ...... re ee ee ee 284.81 September /October DepoSitS ..........ccceceses 106.00 Interest Earned: scsi dS tans ee bho ae qlee elaine »» 7.90 September /October Expenses ........c.eceeceees 451.60 October 31, 1990 Balance ..... ee ere 762.66 Estimated November /December Expenses ........ 300.00 Estimated Year-End Balance ........... Tr $462.66

a

CUSTOMIZING YOUR C128D By Lawrence Chin

Commodore left off many options for the C128D that came with a plain C128 and external 1571. The C128D drive reset button is also recessed and is difficult to press with your fingers. You might want to use an external drive as drive 8 so you can retain the C128D internal 1571 as a backup. That way, you can still use your C128D while the external drive is being serviced. Unfortunately, device number change switches were not included on the C128D so you must use a program to change the device number. Suppose you are a SYSOP that just got a new hard drive. You want to set the hard drive as device 8 so the BBS software will autoboot after a power failure or reset, but the C128D internal 1571

is preset to device 68. Or you have been considering a C128D upgrade to include some additional features.

Mr. David MN. Walser of...

Computer U.S.E.R.S., 138 North 5th St., Springfield, OR 97477; Voice (503) 726-8500, FAX (503) 726-7012 will customize a Cl28D for $85.00. Please contact Mr. Walser either via phone or mail BEFORE sending your C128D to discuss what enhancements are to be included and whether or not you want connectors so the modifications can be easily detached. I am sure the price can be adjusted to reflect the amount of modifications. Please include a SASE if you decide to write a letter. On the front of the Cl128D, six mini toggle switches are installed. The switches include JiffyDOS enable/disable, internal 1571 enable/disable, device number change, write protect auto/manual, and write protect enable/disable. The drive reset opening is widened into a circle and a protruding reset button is installed. All enhancements are linked via connectors where applicable so the upgrades can easily be detached for service.

Jif£yDOS enable/disable will switch between the JiffyDOS and stock ROM. Of course, you must already have JiffyDOS in your Cl128D for this switch to work. Internal 1571 snable/disable adds cr rsemovss the 1571D from the serial bus. This feature is the equivalent of plugging or unplugging an external 1571 from the serial bus. Installing a switch to remove power from the 1571D is too complex because of the dual power entry points. Device number change consists of two switches that allow the 1571D to be defined as device 8, 9, 10, or ll. Write protect auto/manual allows the 1571D write protect mechanism to function normally or allows write protect status to be designated by the write protect enable/disable switch. This feature is handy for write protecting a disk in the 1571D without covering the write protect notch or formatting the other side of a Single side disk in the 1571D without the need to punch a notch.

I had a local technician install the six mini toggle switches on the front of the C128D so I cannot vouch for Computer U.S.E.R.S. craftsmanship on this aspect of the C128D modifications. This technician would only do this task and told me that the C128D modifications were too complex. Fortunately, Mr. Walser had the skill to do the job. I am quite pleased with the modifications. Now, my Cl128D is the hi tech piece of equipment that I had always wanted. However, there were a few quirks. I had to return my C128D several times because the internal 1571 did not function correctly. This problem may have been caused by an inherent drive defect, damage during transit, or an oversight in shop. The cause could not be determined in the specified time frame as I needed the C128D for school. In any case, the drive mechanism was entirely replaced. The new drive mechanism is surprisingly quiet as compared with the old mechanisn. When write protect auto/manual is set to manual position, the 1571D will not initialize another disk when inserted even though the circuitry for doing this task has been implemented. So when write protect auto/manual is set to the manual position, you will have to move the write protect enable/disable switch to the other position then back again or send the initialize DOs command. Either step must be taken whenever another disk is placed in the 1571D. Otherwise, the disk might be corrupted as the BAM is not updated to reflect the disk content. However, this procedure need not be performed when write protect auto/manual is in the auto position as the 1571D will automatically do the task.

KKK KKK

3

THE 64/128 MEETS THE VCR ma By Aaron Peromsik

Lately, we have had much discussion in the CML about using our computers to create Video titles. We have discussed programs that are good for video titles, and ways to hook\_/ up the computer to the VCR. I'd like to look at the many uses of some cheap, readily available, and easy to install hardware components that you can buy to help you in making your video title screens.

What are these magical components? RCA-type cables and connectors, of course. There are many connectors and cables available, each costing not much more than a dollar or two. These versatile cables and connectors can be used for audio or video with your computer and VCR, as well as other equipment such as your stereo system or tape recorder.

The basic essentials are two cables, each with a male RCA plug on each end. These plugs should be similar to the plugs on the cable that connects your computer to your monitor. The cable which came with your computer to connect it to the modulator for using the TV as a monitor is one such cable; you can buy another in the electronics section of your favorite department store. If your computer is close enough to your VCR, you may not need any cables; if you want to use sound and video from two separate sources, you will need at least one cable.

Many different connectors will come in handy. One type provides a jack for the RCA plug on one side, and a 3.5mm plug on the other. This is useful for connecting to a monaural (non-stereo) tape recorder for audio. (Incidentally, two of these, two tape recorders, and one cable will allow you to make clean copies of non-stereo audio tapes.) Another type of connector allows you to connect two cables, giving you one long cable. I use this setup because my VCR is one room away from my computer, and it's easier to string cables across a room than to move the VCR each time I want to use it.

Now that we've covered the equipment, let's get set up to record a title screen. You can use audio or video from any 64 or 128 40-column programs you like. Movie Maker ($14 from Electronic Arts and available elsewhere for under $10) provides some simple animation tools, or you might try a simple Doodle or Koala slideshow, or the Screen Magic feature of the Print Shop if you're careful. Sound can come from your favorite game, SIDPIC/Si¢ Editor file, or any other sound program you have, or you can use your favorite song from that rock 'n roll album you bought last week.

If you are using sound and video from separate sources, you will need to first get the soundtrack onto an audio tape. The rock album should be fine as-is if it's a cassette, but if it's a CD or record you may have to put it on tape unless your CD player or record player has a RCA jack or earphone jack. (Often stereo systems use RCA jacks to connect the speakers to the console; you can use one of these as your audio source. Y-cables are also available, so you can use both as your audio source. Using the earphone jack may require a stereo-to-mono converter, which is just a plug that should be under $3.)

Once you've got the audio on tape, load up the software that you want to use for the video and get it ready to play. Get the audio set to play, too. Look on the back of your VCR: you should see a set of RCA jacks labelled Audio In, Audio Out, Video In, Video Out. Plug your video source into the Video In jack: either use the RCA plug coming out of your monitor directly, or extend it with plugs and cables. Plug your audio source into the Audio In jack on the VCR: string a cable from the VCR to the audio source, using the appropriate connector. Signal the VCR to record, and start your audio and video rolling. Hopefully, the result will be a nice title screen for your video tape. You can use more cables to string the VCR's output back to your monitor to watch the progress of your recording, or you can watch it on a TV if there is one still connected to the VCR.

This is just one of the many uses for RCA cables and connectors. Once you understand this process, you can try to be a little adventurous with a stereo system and try some low-quality sound mixing for an interesting sound track. Above all, have fun with it.

RRKKKRRK

Q-NAME UPDATE: GradyB3 -- Grady Brown

BUY /SELL/TRADE

LAWRENCE CHIN has a C128D version of JiffyDOS for sale for $53. New and still in Original packaging. Buyer must be located at a UPS deliverable address. Also, he is looking for the lightpen version of Koalapainter. His copy got corrupted.

MARK KKH

THOMAS GABBA wants to buy a Commodore 1650 modem in good working order. Will pay no

more than $30. Write or call him at (619) 256-5782. KKK KR KKH

REX WHETZEL is still looking for: COMPUTE! pre-83 and MAY83; various issues of AHOY and other magazines EXCEPT for Gazette and RUN that have C64 or VIC-20 programs. Books are also welcome. Rex has for sale: 62 issues of COMPUTE GAZETTE from SEP83 to JUL89 for $31.00 PLUS postage. Also, 46 issues of RUN from MAR84 to NOV88 for $23 PLUS postage. "These prices are firm, but I'm always interested in any kind of a trade."

REX also has two programs that he would like to trade for ???7? One is SHAPE UP (The Preschooler's Shape Sorting Game) by Hayden Software and the other is SKATEROCK by ShareData. Both have original boxes and instructions.

Members have donated the following. Prices include shipping, everything over the shipping cost goes into our treasury. Jean Nance.

Assembler: Commodore. Disk and manual "for the experienced assembly language programmer". $10.

"The Communicator", telecommunication program. Free Spirit Software. Disk and manual. Originally $29.95 $10

DFile 128, Michaelsoft. Database. Disk only. Originally $30. $10.

Krackerjack. "The Shotgun", and "Blast Disk Protection". Disks. $5 each.

QuantumLink Telecommunications starter kit. Original price $9.95. §5.

If you have questions, write to HAL McARGLE who donated the above; send orders directly to me.

Two tapes. "An Introduction to Basic Part I and Part II. Commodore. $5. Donated by BRIAN VAUGHAN.

The Elementary Commodore 64. William Sanders. 1984. $5

Learn Basic Programming in 14 Days on Your Commodore 64. Gill Schechter. 1984. Good beginner guide. $7.

Cookbook of Creative Programs for the Commodore 64. Robert Rinder. 1984. Projects for music, animation, and telecommunications. Intermediate. $7.

CPM Kit for the Commodore 128. An Introduction to CP/M. Gallego and Fuller 1987. Book and 2 disks. $10.

The above, in good-as-new condition, were donated by ELLY CAREY.

A few hard copy back issues of the CML are still available. Sep.'88, Mar.'89, Nov.'89, Mar.'90 and May'90. $1.50 each.

JOE TOMS wants cartridges for the C64, game or educational, suitable for classroom use. Please tell what cartridge you have for sale and give a short. description. Thank you!

LONNIE SMATHERS is selling THE NEWSROOM for $5, with the purchase price donated to

the club treasury. Write me if you are interested. (In original box, in excellent condition. )

Note: If you would like to donate something to be sold for the benefit of the group, I would prefer that you sell it personally and send a check for the proceeds to Elly Carey. This saves postal fees and my time. Jean Nance.

>

TIPS BRIAN VAUGHAN says that the new Gazette edition of Compute Magazine debuted in October. If you wish to subscribe or renew, the best way to do so is to call their toll- free number: 800-727-6937, and specify the Gazette edition. Ask them to bill you. If you; are renewing and your current subscription is still ongoing, be sure to start the renewal the month after which the old subscription runs out. If they ask for a promotion code, indicate "YJLYO" to get the $12.97 rate. mK KK KK JEFFERY ENGLE informs FRANCIS REDMOND that there are a few programs that support the REU, GEOS 2.0 and Paperclip II being two. Docs for the REU can be obtained from Commodore either by Q-Link or writing to them. RAK KKKK DON DROEGE had a question about a disk copy program that supports the REU. JEFFERY ENGLE suggests Maverick (not a DOS wedge), and Super Snapshot V5, which has its problems. Refer to CML July 1990.

RKKKRKEK

Use GeoCalc for the home budget and/or for investments, says JEFFERY ENGLE. KRKRKKKK MARGARET WYLDE has a time-saver if you are typing in a lot of DATA statements from a magazine article: Look at the DATA statements. They will usually have a uniform increment, such as 10, 20, 30, etc., or 5, 10, 15, etc. Type in DIRECT mode, no line numbers:

For N=10 to 100 step 10:PRINT N "DATA":NEXT N, then press RETURN. You will see on the screen:

10 DATA 20 DATA etc.

Run the cursor up to the first line and press RETURN after each line to put them in memory. Now you may move back up to the first line and proceed to enter the DATA numbers or words. The computer will accept 80 characters/line number and will insert the seconc row of characters on the screen while moving the next line number down. Try it.

This will also work for the other program line numbers, but you must specify an_/ acceptable character for the word DATA. A "?" works fine. You then start the program line, overwriting the "?" unless it is part of the line.

FRANCIS REDMOND found a gender changer for a 6-pin Commodore connector through an ad in RUN magazine. Apparently they also have other electronic hookup equipment, he says. Write: VSI, 3641 SW Evelyn, Portland, OR 97219. Phone: (503) 246-0924.

mM KKK

PATRICK TIMLIN directs those who need color ribbons to: Ribbonland, P.O. Box 506, Exton, PA 19341. Phone 1-800-221-4892 for catalog. They also carry colored paper, labels and other printing supplies.

ma KK eK

BOB BRUGGEMEYER says, "Beware of Damark International, Inc., 7101 Winnetka Ave. N.. Minneapolis, MN 55428." It took him 5 months and 12 days to get a $74 refund for an item he had ordered and which was out of stock. He had to write the BBB of MN, the Minneapolis Postmaster and finally to the City Attorney of Minneapolis before he got his money back. Damark sells out-of-production items and offers quite a bit in the computer line. But, CAVEAT EMPTOR!!! |

A C64 Speedscript tip from BRIAN VAUGHAN: If you LOAD a very large file and then hit CTRL-Z to go to the end of the file, you may see a screen full of garbage. To see your normal text screen, press CTRL-= or CTRL-7 to display memory available, and your text screen will appear. To regain the cursor, press F5 and SPACE.

If Star NX-1000 Rainbow printer owners have difficulty in embedding Rainbow commands in letters and documents, BOB BRUGGEMEYER has prepared command sheets for Fleet System 4 The Write Stuff, Speedscript 128 and Fontmaster 128. Write him for copies of thes) sheets.

BOB also says that Computer Friends of Portland, OR, makes a re-inking device which he has used for several years, and there is also available an attachment for re-inking

6

color ribbons. Also, Reliable Office Supply sells color ribbons for $37.74 for 6. Write to Bob for addresses of these two businesses. eK KKK KK REX WHETZEL advises that if you can't get icons to show on a GEOS load and you are trying to load with the printer on, turn the printer off. (ALSO, it would be a good idea not to turn any peripherals on or off while a program is loading! -- Editor.)

KERR KKHK

TOM PAUL says: I like to type-in programs from the magazines that I subscribe to, so I have entered onto one disk all of the checksum, debugging, and miscellaneous programs that help get a program up and running. Now I don't have to go searching for any one program. It's right there on the same disk. Just save the program and then load the appropriate program to debug or get it running.

The following short program saves time when saving a program being typed-in.

59999 end

60000 zz$="filename":openl5,8,15," SO:"+zzS$:save""+zz$,8:verify ""+zz$,8

60001 closel5:list:end

List this program, to start a typing session, and then start typing. When you are through typing, list the program. Then type in direct mode, "run 60000", and return. It will open "filename" (or any name you choose), scratch the original file, save the new file, verify the new file, close the channel, and list the new saved file to the screen. You can then continue typing in your program.

Also, I have a copy of Big Blue Reader, and have not been able to use it, until the other day. I have been able to converse with Wade Porter, (a new member who does not have a Commodore Computer) using BBR. BUT, it is restricted to using ASCII. Therefore, it can transfer text only, because it strips all control codes and packs it like a text file.

We have not tried to send using CP/M, or typing a program using a word processor.

TOM PAUL has an answer to Greg Dent About astronomy: I have typed in the following programs you might be interested in:

#1. Stars -- an astronomical simulation. It turns your computer into an interactive star chart, plus a quiz to enhance study. Compute!'s Gazette Oct 1987 pg68

#2. Solarpix-Set the solar system in motion, trace the orbits of Halley's and other comets, and look through a file of fascinating facts about our solar system. Compute!'s Gazette Special 1968 issue

#3. Stars II-Sky chart simulator plus files of information about the solar system.

Compute:'s Gazette Aug 1989 pg32

As editor of this issue of the CML, LONNIE SMATHERS suggests future contributors of articles to the CML leave out ALL unnecessary spaces in the text, (as in "hanging indent" style) so the editor won't have extra editing to do if your material is used. Thanks!

JOLENE EHRET: the Centering Code for the Fontmaster label program should be (cy) not (c) as stated in the last issue of the CHL.

KRKEKKKKK

TOM PAUL: I like to type-in programs from the magazines that I subscribe to, so I have entered onto one disk all of the checksum, debugging, and miscellaneous programs that help get a program up and running. Now I don't have to go searching for any one program. It's right there on the same disk. Just save the program and then load the appropriate program to debug or get it running.

The following short program saves time when saving a program being typed-in.

59999 end

60000 zzS="filename":openi15,8,15," SO:"+zz$:save""+zz$,8:verify ""+z2$,8

60001 closel5:list:end

List this program, to start a typing session, and then start typing. When you are through typing, list the program. Then type in direct mode, "run 60000", and return. It will open "filename" (or any name you choose), scratch the original file, save the new file, verify the new file, close the channel, and list the new saved file to the screen. You can then continue typing in your program.

7

Also, I have a copy of Big Blue Reader, and have not been able to use it, until the : other day. I have been able to converse with Wade Porter, (a new member who does not have a Commodore Computer) using BBR. BUT, it is restricted to using ASCII. Therefore, it can transfer text only, because it strips all control codes and packs it like a text file.

We have not tried to send using CP/M, or typing a program using a word processor. a,

TOM PAUL has an answer to Greg Dent About astronomy: I have typed in the following programs you might be interested in: #1. Stars -- an astronomical simulation. It turns your computer into an interactive star chart, plus a quiz to enhance study. Compute!'s Gazette Oct 1987 pg68 #2. Solarpix~-Set the solar system in motion, trace the orbits of Halley's and other comets, and look through a file of fascinating facts about our solar system. Compute!'s Gazette Special 1968 issue #3. Stars II-Sky chart simulator plus files of information about the solar system. Compute:'s Gazette Aug 1989 pg32 maka K KKK As editor of this issue of the CML, LONNIE SMATHERS suggests future contributors of articles to the CML leave out ALL unnecessary spaces in the text, (as in "hanging indent’ style) so the editor won't have extra editing to do if your material is used. Thanks! KR KKK K JOLENE EHRET: the Centering Code for the Fontmaster label program should be (cy) not (c) as stated in the last issue of the CML.

22 22 8S 3

A CANADIAN GOVERNMENT OFFERING By Terry Parsons

The Canadian federal government is running a free question-and-answer database system that is available to the public. The topic of the system is the new goods and service tax that the government is planning. You use your modem to reach the system by dialing 1-800- 267-4500. Canadian callers should be at half duplex, while American callers should be at. full duplex. When you get a connection to the system, press return slowly a couple times \/ Then just follow the instructions on your screen. The information available is very useful and informative.

QUICK BROWN BOX By Jean Nance

The Quick Brown Box is a cartridge for the 64 or 128 that can store programs. Most Basic and ML programs (but not sequential files), can be stored in the box, using a simpie utility that is provided. A stored program can be loaded into your computer instantly, and run, with a three character code. The cartridge has a 10-year lithium battery.

The QBB is available from the maker, Brown Boxes, 26 Concord Rd. Bedford, MA. 01730, in 16K, 32K, 64K, 128K and 256K versions. Briwall advertises the 128K and 256K boxes, and can provide the 64K. Their prices are a little lower than the manufacturer's.

The QBB can be used as a RAM disk which will not lose its data when you turn off your computer. Programmers, or those who type in programs, can choose to save/replace their current version of a program instantly with two keystrokes. If the power fails, the most recent version of your program is safe in the box.

If you consider investing in a QBB, here are points to consider. A QBB can hold C-64 programs or C-128 programs but not both at one time. The advertising says "up to 30 programs can be stored in a QBB", but a 64K box, for example, can only hold 255 blocks worth of programs. I wish I had known these facts before I made my decision to buy. I have two 64K QBBs. I am reasonably pleased with my purchase, but wish better information had been available. My box devoted to 128 programs is given over to a special QBB version of TWS 128. My 64 box contains "Power Driver Comal" and a few most-used utilities.

KERN KK

.

BUY/SELL/TRADE (continued)

JEAN NANCE has the following personal items for sale:

Compute's Gazette: Apr-Dec.'84, all of '85, '86, '88, and Jan-Feb.'89. Commodore: May/June, Jul/Aug. and Sep/Oct '84

RUN: Sep-Dec '84, Jan-Mar, June-Jul, Oct-Dec '85, all of '86, Jan '87, and Feb-Dec "89, Prices: $6 a year; you must take the whole year if available. Partial year, 65 cents/issue. Individual, 75 cents an issue. Postage or UPS will be added to this.

Two "Write Now" cartridge word processors, Cardware, with manuals. $9 each. "Rabbit" cartridge, Eastern House.(Load/save from tape almost as fast as disk drive), manual. $9. Machine Language monitor cartridge (Eastern House). $9. 64 Modem, 300 baud, and VIP term program. $10. These prices include shipping.

RRM KK KK

New Members

CHARLES ANDRAZYK. 6011 Lapaz Ct. New Port Richey, FL. 34653. Charles is a retired sales engineer. His interests outside of computing are TV, VCR, and VCR rentals. He has a C-64, two 1541 disk drives, an Epson Homewriter and a Star Micronics NX1000 printer, an 1802 monitor. and 300 baud modem. His computing interests are in wordprocessing, desktop publishing, Geos, and telecommunication. He enjoys recording computer output to VCR tape. He is disabled by multiple sclerosis, and hopes the group will be a way to have more personal contact with other Commodore users.

FEROL AUSTEN. P.O. Box 1756, Ogunquit, ME. 03907. Ferol was a journalist for 26 years, is now retired and writing two books. Her interests other than computing are photography, painting, amateur radio (NiFWU), and music. She owns a C-64, and disk drive, printer and monitor. Her computer interests are in word processing, file handling, data bases, desk-top publishing, graphics, graphs, etc. She would like help in using various desk-top publishing and application programs.

MELVIN F. BARAL. Ferry Road, RR2, Bridgeport, NY. 08014-9760. Melvin was a scientific glass blower for DuPont before his retirement. He attained a college degree in science and art after retirement, is now taking a college course in computer graphics. His interests outside of computing are fishing, and cooking. He owns a C-128, a 1571 disk drive, a C2N cassette, an MPS 801 printer, 1902 monitor, 1351 mouse, and Westbridge C6420 modem. His main interest in computing is in card game programs.

DOMINIQUE BIOSVERT. 3371 Jean-Brillant #306. Montreal, P.Q. H3T 1N9, Canada. Dominique is a film and video editor. His interests other than computing are natural sciences, especially Ornithology, archaeology, scuba diving and photography. He owns a C-64C, a 1541 II disk drive, an Amtech RF512C, a Star NX-1000 color printer, a Minimodem 6200, 1764 REU, The Final Cartridge, and a 1351 mouse. His interests in computing are in graphics and word processing.

HARRY BLAKE-KNOX. Box 1, Grand Beach, Man., ROE OTO., Canada. Harry was publisher of an are community newspaper for 33 years. He is now turning out a weekly syndicated computer Soest which appears in almost 70 Canadian weeklies. He has a C-64, a 1571 disk drive, a CBM #1250 Drinter, a color monitor, and an Abba printer ribbon inker. His special computer interest is in using the featurs of SpeedScript to produce his computer column.

MILTON BROWN. 20311 Ravenwood Lane, Huntington Beach, CA. 92646. Milton is retired from the Contracts and Pricing Department of Rockwell Aerospace. His interests other than computing are golf and bridge. He has a C-64C, two 1541 disk drives, a Citizen MPS10 Printer, a 1701 monitor, and an Epyx Fast Load cartridge. His computer interests are Basic programming, Print shop, and card, Las Vegas and golf games. He is active in the Coastline Computer Club, and nas taught special interest groups on data bases, spreadsheets, and word processing.

JAMES H. CALDWELL, JR. 125 Barr St. 3Bi3, Hillsdale, MI. 49242. James works in broadcasting, electronics, and data processing. His interests other than computing are shortwave radio, CWASSWM), camping, watching movies, and recording movies on video. He has a C-64, a C-128, two 1541 disk drives, two 1581 disk drives, and a printer. His computer interests are in telecomputing, games, Geos, and utilities.

STEVEN CALLOWAY. 26 Dianne Avenue. Portsmouth, RI. 02871. "Cal" is a retired Nava! Aviator, USNA. His interests other than computing are golf, Dixie (traditional) jazz, and cooking. Ke owns two C-64s, two 1541 disk drives, two 1571 disk drives, a 1525 and an SP1000 printer, an REU 1764, Quick Brown Box 32K, and a VolkKsmodem 12. His computing interests are in orogramming in Basic, ML, and C.

WILLIE CAMPBELL. 1712 S. Linn, Marshall, MO. 65340. Willie had a career as a professiona! musician, is now a student studying for a Doctor of Chiropractic degree at Cleveland Chiropractic College, Kansas City, MO. His interests outside of computing are music, sport: reading, welding, woodworking, hot rods, and his wife and 8 month old daughter. He owns a 64, a 1541 disk drive, an OKimate-20 printer, and a C= 1702 monitor. His main interest in computing is in word processing, he owns Word Pro Plus 3, but has no manual and would like

neip With: it.

ALEXANDER CATAPANG JR. #42 Cabbage St, Upper Quezon Hill, Baguio City, Philippines. Alex is a student. His interest other than computing is roller skating. He has a C-64 and a tape cassette, he hopes to add more peripherals later. His interests in computing are in Basic programming, especially sprites and graphics. He is also interested in voice programs. He would like to learn more about programming, in any computer language.

KAREN CROSBY. 608 E.Court, Chariton, IA., 50049. Karen is a homemaker. Her interests other than computing are making cloth dolls, collecting dolls, making Teddy bears, building dol! houses and furniture, music, and writing to penpals. She owns a C-64, a 1541 disk drive, an Okidata 120 printer, and a C= 1702 monitor. She is very new to computing, would like especially to learn about word processing and music programs.

ROGER DeLISLE. 867 Ave. Paradis, Ste.Foy, Quebec. Gi¥ 2T7. Roger is retired from the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. His interests other than computing are reading, traveling, and music. He owns a C-64, a 1541 disk drive, and a Vic 1525 printer. His interests in computing are “anything but arcade type games." Roger is French speaking, and says he will find practicing English most interesting.

BETTY JEAN DILL. 168 Bullington Road, Spartanburg, SC. 29301-9003. Betty Jean is a production machine operator for Michelin Tire Corp. Her interests other than computing are photography, home sewing, and gardening, and enjoying her grandsons, ages 14, 12, and 7. She has two C- 64s, a C-128, one MSD disk drive, three 1541 and a 1571 disk drive. Also an amber monitor, two 1902 monitors, Star 1000NX, Star NX10, Panasonic 1080, OkKimate 20, and Seikosha SP1i000 printers, a 1750 cline REU, and Georam. Her interests in computing are in word processing, educational programs and games for her grandsons, and using Print Shop and PrintMaster. She would like advice on learning how to use Geos.

BOB ESTAND. 8910 Strand Ln., El Paso, TX. 79904. Bob is a retired telephone company technician, now employed by the University of Texas at El Paso as telecommunications service technician. His interests other than computing are shortwave amateur international! radio monitoring, U.S. stamps, aviation, and photography. He has a C-64, 1541, 1571, and FSD-1 disk drives, a 1200 AI printer and a Seikosha printer, Exetec Gold Interface, 1802 and 192 monitors, a SWL shortwave radio interface, McInker ribbon inker, and several fastload Cartridges. His computing interests are word processing, MIDI music to/with a Yamaha Keyboard, shortwave Morse code/teletype interfaced to printer for direct read out/printouts. Also titling VCR tapes, and utilities. He would like to locate schematics/circuit drawings for his monitors.

RALPH G. EVANS. 259 Morris Blvd, Manahawkin, NJ. 08050. Ralph is a newspaper platemaker (stereotyper). His interest outside of computing is amateur radio, although his call signal is inactive at this time. He has a C-64, a 1541 disk drive, a Star NX-1000C printer, and a color TV as a monitor. As to computer interests, he says, “Just beginning, attempting to learn from the ground up".

TOM GAUTIER. 3905 Apache Ct., Boulder, CO. 80303. Tom is a NOAA physicist. His interests other than computing are listening to classical music, and occasional needlework. He has a C- 64, a C-128, a 1541 disk drive, (Jiffy Dos V5 equipped), a 1541 II disk drive, a datasette, an Epson RX-80 printer with Cardco B interface, a C-1526 printer, a Sonyo monochrome monitor and a Commodore 1802 monitor. Also a 1351 mouse, and Koala Painter. His computer interests are in programming. He is a member of the Front Range Commodore Club, Longmont, CO.

JIM GREEN. 304 Parkwood Dr. West Monroe, LA. 71291. Jim is retired, he formerly owned a IV repair service. His interests in addition to computing are electronics, and early rock and folk music. He has a C-128 and and Amiga 2000 computer, 1541, 1571, MSD SD-2 and Master 3A-1 disk drives, Epson LX-80 and Panasonic KX-P1124 printers, C-1701 and C-1034 monitors, and a 1670 modem. His computer interest is in collecting public domain programs, improving then, and writing instructions where necessary so a beginner can use them. He donates these “Jim Green Disks“ to public domain distribution companies, but does not provide them to individuals. They are available through p.d. distributors.

JERRY HADLEY. 140 Jason Drive, Oxford, AL. 36203. Jerry is a dental technician. His interests © other than computing are fishing and basketball. He owns a C-64, two 1541 disk drives, a Star . NX-1000 Rainbow printer, a Star NX-10 printer, Magnavox RGB 80 monitor, and Warp Speed/Explode cartridge. His computer interests are in word processing and desktop publishing, and data bases. He is learning Geos. He would like help with Geopublish and Geopaint, also tips on The Write Stuff, Paperclip Publisher, and Datafile 3.6. oe BUD HARDING. Rt 1, Box 344, Shawnee, OK. 74801. Bud is semi-retired but is an estate

caretaker. His interests other than computing are music, reading non-fiction, and garage

sales. He has an SX-64, a 1541 II disk drive, an NX-1000C Rainbow color printer, VolKs 6470 modem, Super Explode V 5.0 Fastload color cartridge and Video Byte 11, a Magnavox color monitor, Voice Master Jr. and a McInker. His computer interests are in desktop publishing, Geos, and Geopublish.

PHILIP A. HASTINGS. 874 North Park Ave., Pomona, CA. 91768. Philip is retired, was an accounting clerk and before that and Air Force instructor in meteorology. His interests other than computing are weather, travel, reading (Stephen King and Len Deighton), and dabbling in metaphysics. He has a C-64, two 1541 drives, a Panasonic 1180 printer, and two color monitors. He plans to buy another printer. His main computer interest now is getting a good text product with his computer, he would like to branch out and do other things.

WILLIAM HOUCK. 1681 11th Place, Vero Beach, FL. 32960. William is a retired fireman. His interests other than computing are golf and the stock market. He owns a C-64, a 1541 IT disk Grive, an Excelerator Plus disk drive, a Seikosha SP 1000 printer, a color monitor, and a

1200 baud modem. His special computer interest is in programming, and he says, "Will answer all letters".

JOSEPH H. HUMPHREY. 414 N. 23rd St., Waco, TX. 76707. Joseph is retired from the U.S. Army and the Veteran’s Administration. His hobby is licensed amateur radio (WDSEYU) and he has an advanced class license. He owns a Vic-20, a C-64, and a C-128, a 1541, a 1571 and a 1581 disk drive, Seikosha SP-1000VC printer, a Panasonic KX-P1092I printer, and an RGB monitor. His computer interests are programming and the use of computers in amateur radio operations.

DIANA M. HUSBAND. 8450 W. Cedar St., Orland Park, IL. 60462. Diana is a housewife. Her oe interests other than computing are calligraphy, reading, and herbs. She has a C-128. two 1571 disk drives, an Okidata 120 printer, 1902A monitor, and a 1750 REU. She uses her computer

mostly for word processing, but is anxious to learn about other aspects of computing, including telecommunication.

LOUIS A. JOHNSON. 5641 N. Mesa Dr., Castle Rock, CO. 80104. Lou is a retiring electrica! engineer. His interests outside of computing are radio, photography, home maintanence, electrical engineering, CAD, and Intergraph. He has two Vic 20s, a C-64 and a C-128. Also two

printers, 3 disk drives, a monitor and four modems. His special computer interest is in Loadstar.

JUDY KERNS. RD #2, Box 423, Claysville, PA. 15323-9418. Judy is a housewife, who runs a home rubber stamp business. Her interests other than computing are a diet friendship club which she runs. She has a C-64, 1541 II disk drive, Okidata 180 printer, and a Commodore 1802 monitor. She would like to learn more about Geos, and about word processing and desktop publishing for publishing her club newsletter. She would also like to Know how to put covers

together to mail newsletters, and if anyone Knows of a program for putting a cookbook together.

ALBERT KOSAK. 1772 W. 15th Ave., Apache Junction, AZ. 85220. Albert was an electronic technician with the weather bureau, now retired. His interests other than computing are amateur radio (NTLIP), photography, playing the organ, and chess. He has two C-64s, two 1541

drives, an MRS1000 printer, and a 1902A monitor. He is interested in all phases of computing.

IRVIN KURBURSKI, JR. 3rd 1D Band, APO NY. 09036. “Earl" is an Army musician. His Interests: \. J